After a good night’s sleep, I felt better in the morning. Even though I had crossed Carson Pass yesterday, I still had a couple of humps to get over before I started to descend. Once again, the mountains were beautiful and a pleasure to ride through.

image

There is always a downhill after a climb. Sometimes it just takes a while to get to it. Today, I got to it. I dropped from over 8000 feet to just above sea level in about 70 miles. The rapid change in air pressure crushed my water bottles.

image

image

image

image

image

image

image
Fiddletown, CA

I had planned to stop in Plymouth, CA, and wait out the storm tomorrow. When I reached Plymouth, I was still feeling good and pushed on. Several miles down the road, I stopped for a break and met Lawry, a local cyclist. We chatted for about an hour. By the time we finished talking, it was dark. I have avoided riding in the dark for the most part on this journey. However, tonight I really didn’t have a choice. Fortunately, a few miles down the highway, I turned onto a bicycle path that led me into a suburb of Sacramento.

image

image

image
Lawry

By the time I finished pedaling today, I had ridden just over 90 miles. It was the most distance I rode in one day. Of course, it was helped by the drop out of the mountains into the Sacramento Valley, but I was still pretty wiped out by the time I finished.

3 thoughts on “There is Always a Downhill After a Climb (October 13)

    1. The descent was slow enough my ears didn’t pop. I don’t know about blood pressure, but I think my lungs were happy to be at lower altitudes again.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s