I woke up today tired, sore and frustrated. I tried to figure out a way to rationalize taking the day off, but I’ve only been on the road two days. The people I have met who have done these types of long term physical treks have told me it takes three to four weeks to get into a rhythm and to find your pace. I’ve been traveling for three weeks and don’t feel like I have gotten anywhere close to any rhythm. Looking down the road today, I did not know where I was going to stop. Planning day by day is getting to me a little.

I also got a late start because I was waiting for a store in Manchester to open so I could buy a small dry sack. I want to move a few thing out of the panniers to the top of the rack for easier access during the day.

I figured I would try to ride at least a little, even if I only made it ten miles down the road. However, once I got ten miles down the road, I felt pretty good. The endorphins must have kicked in. It also helped that I didn’t have any major climbs today. I was surrounded by mountains, but didn’t have to climb any. The highway I took followed the Batten Kill River out of Vermont and into New York. The river must have carved through the mountains to get to the Hudson because the route was mostly flat. Entering New York state lifted my spirits a bit, which was unexpected. It was like being home in a way.

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I started smelling a foul oder and couldn't figure out what it was until I saw this. It wasn't the only deer carcass I saw today, but definitely the most noxious.
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People getting ready for horseback riding near the Batten Kill River.
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The Welcome to New York sign was the largest I have passed, a very New York thing to do.
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The wildflowers along the highway are different.

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A small hydro-electric dam near Valley Falls, NY.

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I can't figure out how to pronounce the name of this town.
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Some old tractors outside a trading post south of Schaghticoke.

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The wildflowers changed. The trees as well. There were cottonwood trees shedding. Sometimes it was pretty thick. I was a little afraid that I would breath some into my lungs. I guess the moisture of my mouth and nose would catch them before they got too far.

More old cars drove south of Cambridge, NY, not just sports cars this time. There was even a Model A pickup, honking at people as it drove though town. I turned onto another highway, so I don’t know where they all went.

I made it almost to Albany, NY. I will be following the Hudson River for the next day or two, which should be a nice change of pace.

5 thoughts on “Home-ish (June 4)

  1. Thanks for the blogs, Brad. Your photos are stunning. I love that you describe your feelings, ups and downs. Hope today is an incredible day.

    Like

  2. re: , “terrible hill”. How did you know the specific grades ? 9%, etc. Are there signs along the road or does your bike have a gadget that tells you ?
    My friend, Carol, has joined your blog and loves it as much as I do. 🙂

    Like

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