The place where I camped was next to some petroglyphs. Before I left, I decided to take a little hike to see them. They were a little disappointing. Many simply looked like scratched hash marks in the rock. There were also several that resembled horseshoes with thick lines in the middle, like some sort of ancient “Kilroy was here” drawings.

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

There was one rock face that had modern petroglyphs in it, leaving messages like, “Give peace a chance.” It made me wonder if the older petroglyphs were nothing more than some form of ancient graffiti. It’s almost like people see a smooth cliff made of soft stone and can’t help themselves. Regardless of time or culture, they have to leave their mark.

image

image

The rock outcroppings were pretty cool, though. They had a lot of rounded holes. I don’t know if they were formed by bubbles in the sediment that were later exposed or by the erosion process itself. Either way, they were fascinating to look at.

image

image
The view from the end of the petroglyph trail. No highways or any other sign of people in sight.

Today was a short milage day, but was dominated by a steep climb over Austin Summit. The temperatures got down below freezing last night and remained cool through the day. I had only planned to ride to Austin, NV, about 25 miles from the petroglyphs, so I tried to just relax and not worry too much about how long it was taking to climb. Still, I am getting pretty tired of climbing. Fortunately, this should be my last real climb until the Sierra Nevadas.

image

image
Austin, NV

image

5 thoughts on “Ancient Graffiti (October 5)

  1. Do you know how old the petroglyphs are ? Fascinating to think you’re looking at writing/drawing done by some,” caveman”, maybe thousands of years ago.
    Maybe the scratches were done by some of those short faced bears.
    I’m going to call Paul and suggest he look at this post. He loves that sort of thing.

    Like

      1. I just Googled them and what I found agrees with what you just said. At least 10,000 years old. The oldest in North America.
        Can you tell me more specifically where these were ?

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s